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Tuesday, June 12, 2007

MPR Picks Up on Joe Repya Considering Run Against Norm Coleman

Polinaut gets the same story from Joe Repya as I got earlier this am.

Joe Repya, a retired U.S. Army officer, says he's thinking about running for the U.S. Senate as a Republican against GOP incumbent Norm Coleman. When asked if he's considering a run he said:

"I've received numerous calls and have been approached by a number of people who have asked me to consider running against Norm Coleman for U.S. Senate. I am going to take the next thirty to sixty days to travel around Minnesota since I am currently going to be speaking at a number of Republican event. I am going to sit down with conservative grassroots people throughout the state and assess if that is a viable option. I am making no decisions at this time. I am going take thirty to sixty days to decide what my political future is going to be."

When asked if he thought Coleman was conservative enough for the party, Repya said "The statement I gave you is the only statement that I am making."


I'm sure ANWR, Immigration, and Coleman's vote of no confidence for Gonzalez won't help him with the increasingly restive base.

1 comments:

Dan said...

Personally, I'd rather see Repya stay home and help fix internal party problems rather than send him to Washington, but if he jumps in, I'll probably support him. I've been thinking for some time that someone should challenge Coleman for endorsement. He's done some good things, no question, but some bad as well, and I don't feel that he represents Republican philosophy.

Some will say that Republicans have to compromise their principles to win, to get elected. Really? Do the Democrats do that? Are we so weak that we have to behave like Democrats to get elected? Are conservative views so outmoded that they must be abandoned to survive? If so, there is no point to any of it. I don't think that's the case, however.

The GOP needs to get back on a consistent message of how conservatism benefits the average voter. Develop the message, and hammer the hell out of it. Then (and here's the tricky part) we have to hope the candidates we elect have the integrity and courage to follow through.